Transforming Fibroid Care

Fibroids are the most common growths in the uterus. Their growth is stimulated by oestrogen and progesterone, causing uterine collagen to cross-link and harden, creating  a stiff mass of collagen fibres. Fibroids tend to develop in early perimenopause, when oestrogen levels increase and regress in menopause as oestrogen declines. Fibroids tend to have more oestrogen receptors, so this may be one reason oestrogen disproportionately affects the growth of these solid tumours. More than 80% of Black women and nearly 70% of white women have fibroids by age 50. Sometimes these growths are harmless and can even go undetected, but in many cases they cause symptoms ranging from pain and bleeding to infertility. Early warning signs The symptoms of fibroids are relatively common and can be associated with other factors or diseases, such as ovulatory dysfunction, endometriosis or endometrial polyps. Many women do not connect their symptoms to fibroids, so can go undiagnosed for some time, and some fibroids can be asymptomatic, thereby avoiding detection.  Many women have uterine fibroids and don’t even know it. Small fibroids don’t often cause symptoms and don’t regularly affect your life. However, larger fibroids may lead to several warning signs, including: There are long-term complications that can affect the integrity of the endometrium, the uterine lining. This means it can be difficult getting pregnant. During pregnancy, women with fibroids have an increased risk of complications compared with women without fibroids, including Fibroids can also be associated with miscarriage.  The symptoms of fibroids are relatively common and can be associated with other factors or diseases, such as ovulatory dysfunction, endometriosis or endometrial polyps. Many women do not connect their symptoms to fibroids, so can go undiagnosed for some time, and some fibroids can be asymptomatic. Lack of symptoms does not necessarily mean lack of inflammation, so women experiencing infertility should be evaluated to the presence of fibroids. Presentation and Diagnosis Diagnosing fibroids is usually done by transvaginal ultrasound, although this is limiting if the uterus extends beyond the pelvis, a common problem with this disease. Abdominal ultra-sonography might be required to diagnose fibroids that extend beyond the effective range of the trans-vaginal probe, but then MRI is generally preferred.  Women often have more than one fibroid. They can be different in size and in their location. The location of fibroids directly affects the symptoms they induce, as well as the time to the manifestation of such symptoms. For example, submucosal fibroids that bulge into the uterine cavity seem to have more of an effect on abnormal menstrual bleeding and pregnancy problems. This is independent of fibroid size as small fibroids that protrude into the uterine cavity can also induce menstrual irregularities. Conversely, subserosal fibroids that form on the outside of the uterus are slow growing and considerable time is needed before they are of a sufficient bulk to cause symptoms, such as back, leg or pelvic pressure and abdominal and pelvic pain.  The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) has established a classification system which uses an 8-point numerical system to describe the location of fibroids relative to the endometrium (submucosal surface) and the serosal surface, with low numbers indicating a central location. Recently, shear wave elastography (SWE) has been developed as a potential screening tool for the early identification of women at risk for developing fibroids. This provides the option of preventative treatment to delay or even arrest or reverse fibroid progression. Proposed application of SWE as a screening tool for identification of women at risk of fibroid development and corresponding preventive measures to be taken. MyoN: normal non-fibroid myometrium; MyoF: at risk-myometrium, EGCG: Epigallocatechin Gallate. The principle of SWE is to use sound waves to produce images. The sound waves can give an indication of how stiff the uterine tissue is: soft, firm, solid or hard. The stiffness indicates the progression of fibroid growth, as well as the use of appropriate therapies. Biomarkers In urine As oestrogen can fuel the growth of fibroids, it can be helpful to identify whether oestrogen is elevated, and how it’s metabolised. DUTCH urine testing is unique because it helps identify symptoms of hormonal imbalances by providing a complete picture of hormone levels which cannot be seen in testing serum (blood) alone. The DUTCH test can measure the levels of the 3 types of oestrogen, oestrone (E1), oestradiol (E2) and oestriol (E3) and how they are metabolised. Estradiol (E2) is the most biologically active estrogen in the body. However, estrone (E1) and the phase 1 estrogen metabolites (2-OH, 4-OH, 16-OH) can also bind to estrogen receptors. Thus, it is possible that elevations in any of these markers may contribute to fibroid growth. The phase 1 metabolite, 16-OHE1, tends to bind more tightly to oestrogen receptors than the 2-OH and 4-OH metabolites (but not nearly as tightly as E2), and is known to cause tissue groeth. If too much oestrogen is metabolised into the 16-OHE1 form, it may contribute to increased fibroid growth.  Having this information is extremely valuable, because it means that as a practitioner I can first reduce the amount of oestrogen and alter the metabolism of oestrogen in a more favourable way. In blood The CA-125 blood test measures the amount of CA125 protein that both women and men have in their blood. CA-125 is elevated in cases of fibroids, endometriosis and adenomyosis, as well as ovarian cancer. This means that it can’t be used to identify any one of these conditions, but it can be used to monitor progression. Development and Progression of Fibroids Fibroids are associated with high oestrogen levels, or oestrogen dominance. Obesity and the perimenopausal state are often associated with higher oestrogen levels. Studies have shown that oestrogen levels are actually higher in perimenopausal women, and fat is  hormonal organ capable of producing oestrone, a strong oestrogen. The inflammatory mediators interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and leuko- triene B4 (LTB4) are also produced in the adipocyte and contribute to fibroid formation. MED12 gene mutations created by high oxidative stress in the uterus drive fibroid formation…

Transforming Fibroid Care: Exploring Functional Medicine Approaches for Natural Relief

Fibroids are the most common growths in the uterus. Their growth is stimulated by oestrogen and progesterone, causing uterine collagen to cross-link and harden, creating  a stiff mass of collagen fibres. Fibroids tend to develop in early perimenopause, when oestrogen levels increase and regress in menopause as oestrogen declines. Fibroids tend to have more oestrogen receptors, so this may be one reason oestrogen disproportionately affects the growth of these solid tumours. More than 80% of Black women and nearly 70% of white women have fibroids by age 50. Sometimes these growths are harmless and can even go undetected, but in many cases they cause symptoms ranging from pain and bleeding to infertility. Early warning signs The symptoms of fibroids are relatively common and can be associated with other factors or diseases, such as ovulatory dysfunction, endometriosis or endometrial polyps. Many women do not connect their symptoms to fibroids, so can go undiagnosed for some time, and some fibroids can be asymptomatic, thereby avoiding detection.  Many women have uterine fibroids and don’t even know it. Small fibroids don’t often cause symptoms and don’t regularly affect your life. However, larger fibroids may lead to several warning signs, including: There are long-term complications that can affect the integrity of the endometrium, the uterine lining. This means it can be difficult getting pregnant. During pregnancy, women with fibroids have an increased risk of complications compared with women without fibroids, including Fibroids can also be associated with miscarriage.  The symptoms of fibroids are relatively common and can be associated with other factors or diseases, such as ovulatory dysfunction, endometriosis or endometrial polyps. Many women do not connect their symptoms to fibroids, so can go undiagnosed for some time, and some fibroids can be asymptomatic. Lack of symptoms does not necessarily mean lack of inflammation, so women experiencing infertility should be evaluated to the presence of fibroids. Presentation and Diagnosis Diagnosing fibroids is usually done by transvaginal ultrasound, although this is limiting if the uterus extends beyond the pelvis, a common problem with this disease. Abdominal ultra-sonography might be required to diagnose fibroids that extend beyond the effective range of the trans-vaginal probe, but then MRI is generally preferred.  Women often have more than one fibroid. They can be different in size and in their location. The location of fibroids directly affects the symptoms they induce, as well as the time to the manifestation of such symptoms. For example, submucosal fibroids that bulge into the uterine cavity seem to have more of an effect on abnormal menstrual bleeding and pregnancy problems. This is independent of fibroid size as small fibroids that protrude into the uterine cavity can also induce menstrual irregularities. Conversely, subserosal fibroids that form on the outside of the uterus are slow growing and considerable time is needed before they are of a sufficient bulk to cause symptoms, such as back, leg or pelvic pressure and abdominal and pelvic pain.  The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) has established a classification system which uses an 8-point numerical system to describe the location of fibroids relative to the endometrium (submucosal surface) and the serosal surface, with low numbers indicating a central location. Recently, shear wave elastography (SWE) has been developed as a potential screening tool for the early identification of women at risk for developing fibroids. This provides the option of preventative treatment to delay or even arrest or reverse fibroid progression. Proposed application of SWE as a screening tool for identification of women at risk of fibroid development and corresponding preventive measures to be taken. MyoN: normal non-fibroid myometrium; MyoF: at risk-myometrium, EGCG: Epigallocatechin Gallate. The principle of SWE is to use sound waves to produce images. The sound waves can give an indication of how stiff the uterine tissue is: soft, firm, solid or hard. The stiffness indicates the progression of fibroid growth, as well as the use of appropriate therapies. Biomarkers In urine As oestrogen can fuel the growth of fibroids, it can be helpful to identify whether oestrogen is elevated, and how it’s metabolised. DUTCH urine testing is unique because it helps identify symptoms of hormonal imbalances by providing a complete picture of hormone levels which cannot be seen in testing serum (blood) alone. The DUTCH test can measure the levels of the 3 types of oestrogen, oestrone (E1), oestradiol (E2) and oestriol (E3) and how they are metabolised. Estradiol (E2) is the most biologically active estrogen in the body. However, estrone (E1) and the phase 1 estrogen metabolites (2-OH, 4-OH, 16-OH) can also bind to estrogen receptors. Thus, it is possible that elevations in any of these markers may contribute to fibroid growth. The phase 1 metabolite, 16-OHE1, tends to bind more tightly to oestrogen receptors than the 2-OH and 4-OH metabolites (but not nearly as tightly as E2), and is known to cause tissue groeth. If too much oestrogen is metabolised into the 16-OHE1 form, it may contribute to increased fibroid growth.  Having this information is extremely valuable, because it means that as a practitioner I can first reduce the amount of oestrogen and alter the metabolism of oestrogen in a more favourable way. In blood The CA-125 blood test measures the amount of CA125 protein that both women and men have in their blood. CA-125 is elevated in cases of fibroids, endometriosis and adenomyosis, as well as ovarian cancer. This means that it can’t be used to identify any one of these conditions, but it can be used to monitor progression. Development and Progression of Fibroids Fibroids are associated with high oestrogen levels, or oestrogen dominance. Obesity and the perimenopausal state are often associated with higher oestrogen levels. Studies have shown that oestrogen levels are actually higher in perimenopausal women, and fat is  hormonal organ capable of producing oestrone, a strong oestrogen. The inflammatory mediators interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and leuko- triene B4 (LTB4) are also produced in the adipocyte and contribute to fibroid formation. MED12 gene mutations created by high oxidative stress in the uterus drive fibroid formation…

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